Service-Learning Course Offerings

Service-Learning Course Offerings

Honors 3000 is the course that denotes the following classes as qualifying for the Service-Learning requirement. In order to satisfy the service learning requirement for Honors, you must register for HON 3000 along with an associated course. At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit a 1-2 reflection paper which will discuss your service-learning required of you and how it impacted you as a student. There are several classes to choose from for this additional course; listed below are the course offerings for Spring/Summer and Fall 2019 that have already be approved for the service-learning requirement and the process for nominating any course for the requirement. If you have any questions about the Service-Learning requirement or about registering for courses, please contact the Honors advisors at honors@wayne.edu.

 

Spring 2019 Service-Learning Courses

 

AFS 2530 / HIS 2530 – Black Detroit

CRN: 37422 / 37423

Credits: 3

Professor: David Goldberg

Course Description:

This course explores the historical, cultural and structural aspects of the Black Urban experience in Detroit from the 19thCentury to the present. It is constructed around the role that African Americans played in shaping the city, as well as how racism, urbanization and suburbanization have shaped racial, spatial and economic inequality in the Detroit Metropolitan area. We will utilize an interdisciplinary approach to interrogate the social and cultural history of Black Detroit, and will explore the various forms of Black social movement activism utilized by Black Detroiter's while also examining the ways that shifting economic and political currents have impacted racism, class, space, and resistance throughout the city's history. 

 

ENG 3020 – Writing and Community (IC)

CRN: 37108

Credits: 3

Professor: Rachel Dortin

Course Description:

In this special section of Intermediate Writing (ENG 3010), student's complete reading and writing assignments tied to community service projects. As a service-learning course, the class combines twenty hours of hands-on experience in a community setting with academic work related to that setting. Students in this section choose a service project at an urban senior learning center or at one of two Detroit public elementary schools (one with a primarily Spanish-speaking Latino population and one with a primarily African-American population). Course texts consider research on larger social issues related to each site, for example, literacy learning for non-native speakers of English; challenges in urban education, from parent involvement and teacher qualifications to school funding; the larger socio-economic factors promoting illegal immigration; and research documenting the increasing level of hunger among senior citizens.

 

Fall 2019 Service-Learning Courses

 

AFS 5991: Field Work in the Black Community

CRN: 10331

Credits: 3-8

Professor: Ollie Johnson

Course Description:

Field placement in community-based, human services, and civic organizations and governmental agencies. Restricted to Africana Studies majors.

 

ENG 3020: Writing and Community (IC)

CRN: Varies

Credits: 3

Professor: Varies

Course Description:

As a course that fulfills the Intermediate Composition (IC) general education requirement, English 3020 prepares students for reading, research, and writing in their upper-division courses and majors. Students in English 3020 achieve these outcomes through collaborative community engagement, which combines hands-on experience in a community setting with academic work related to that setting. Unlike volunteers, students in such a class get as much as they give. Students offer their time and labor to the community partner and, in return, get the chance to develop many types of intellectual skills in real community contexts. The course emphasizes researching local problems, analyzing various kinds of texts, writing for different purposes, listening, negotiating with people of different ages and from different backgrounds, and learning to work collaboratively with a diverse array of people and organizations.

 

HIS 3650 / US 3650 - History of Detroit

CRN: 19514 / 19515

T/TH 11:30 - 12:45

Credits: 3

Professor: Robert W. Pfaff

Description: Detroit's history transcends the boundaries of the "local" and encompasses social, political, cultural, and economic processes that have shaped national and international events. In this course we will engage in inquiries that are relevant to the community in which we live and study, while at the same time we will work to understand Detroit's history not just as local city, but as major metropolis that shaped US growth through the automobile, WWII, and suburbanization. We will focus our attention primarily on the experiences of the diverse social groups that have inhabited the city since the eighteenth century. We will do so by reading broadly about the history of Detroit, through discussions of course readings, and by participating in a service learning project in conjunction with the Detroit Historical Society (DHS) on neighborhood histories of the 1967 rebellion. 

 

HON 4930: Detroit Fellows Tutoring Project

CRN: 14566 and 14567

Credits: 2-4 (Honors students must register for 3 or 4 credits)

Professors: Dale Thomas & Marcella Verdun

Course Description:

Earn 2 to 4 Honors credits while teaching reading skills to children in kindergarten through second grade who need additional help in Detroit Public Schools. Detroit Fellows work three (earns 2 credits), five (earns 3 credits) or seven (earns 4 credits) hours per week at their assigned school. The schedule is established by you based on your availability and the number of credits for which you sign up. Tutors work during regularly scheduled school hours: 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

 

SOC 1010: Understanding Human Society

CRN: 18548, 19084, 19085

Credits: 3

Professor: Janet Hankin, Sarah Swider, Michelle Jacobs

Course Description:

This course is intended to introduce you to the field of sociology. In this class, you will be exposed to the general ideas, concepts, theoretical perspectives, and research methods within the field of sociology. The underlying objective of this course is to help you develop a sociological imagination that will foster an enhanced awareness concerning the effects that social forces have on your lives and the lives of your fellow human beings. As part of Wayne State's community engagement initiative, this course will also require you to complete 10 hours of service-learning in a community agency that deals in some way with social inequality. The service-learning knowledge via books by experientially learning about social inequalities as they are manifested in the everyday lives of others in your community. Further, you will have the opportunity to apply your knowledge of social stratification by actively participating in efforts to ameliorate or otherwise cope with the consequences of inequities.

 

SW 1010: Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

CRN: 11585

Credits:  3

Professor: Shantalea Johns

Course Description:

Survey of selected social welfare programs in the United States; history and development; focus on issues related to poverty and dependence.

 

TED 2250: Becoming an Urban Educator

CRN: Varies

Credits: 3

Professor: Varies

Course Description:

Examination of issues surrounding social justice in urban schools and society through the exploration of the historical, political, and social trends that influence education. Course includes a 40- hour service learning field experience.

 

THR 3731:  Applied Theatre Studies: Community Possibilities Theatre

CRN: 18872

Credits:  3

Professor: Mary Anderson

Course Description:

Fundamental theory and practical technique of applied theatre work, especially process drama and play building. Focus on community situations including intergenerational dynamics, community health and social work effectiveness, and areas of outreach involvement.

 

THR 3738:  Applied Theatre Practicum

CRN: 14296

Credits:  1-4

Professor: Mary Anderson

Course Description:

Supervised students work in schools, with youth programs, and in community service settings, implementing applied theatre projects.

 

Honors Option Examples

Below are a few examples of how to fulfill your service-learning requirements with Wayne State University courses using the Honors Option Form if the above courses do not fit your schedule. Please remember that your service must compliment the course material and you must register for HON 3000.

 

Example 1

Course Name: Reporting Race, Gender and Culture - COM 4250

Service-Learning Component:

Volunteer with an organization that services specific demographics (i.e. race and gender) or volunteer at a local newspaper

Example 2

Course Name: Introductory Food Science - NFS 2130

Service-Learning Component:

Volunteer at a soup kitchen, food pantry, or community garden

Example 3

Course Name: Introduction to Drugs, Behavior and Society - PSY 2080

Service-Learning Component:

Volunteer at a rehabilitation center, clinic, or a homeless shelter

Example 4

Course Name: Introduction to Ethics -PHI 2320

Service-Learning Component:

Volunteer with an organization that promotes civil rights, animal rights, etc.

Example 5

Course Name: Law, Authority and Rebellion - PS 3510

Service-Learning Component:

Volunteer at a law firm or politician's office

Example 6

Course Name: Diversity, Oppression and Social Justice - SOC 3110

Service-Learning Component:

Volunteer with an organization that promotes social justice or volunteer at a women's shelter

Example 7

Course Name: Medical Spanish - SPA 3050

Service- Learning Component:

Volunteer language skills at a hospital, senior home and/or clinic